Church of the Redeemer, Jamaica

The Church of the Redeemer

The Church of the Redeemer, corner of North and Duke Streets, Kingston, Jamaica, 1963.

17°58′33″N 76°47′24″W / 17.975753°N 76.790062°W / 17.975753; -76.790062Coordinates: 17°58′33″N 76°47′24″W / 17.975753°N 76.790062°W / 17.975753; -76.790062

Location
Kingston

Country
Jamaica

Denomination
Moravian

Website
www.jamaicamoravian.com www.techadvancejamaica.com/moravian.html

History

Founded
1918 (1918)

Founder(s)
Jonathan Rein

Consecrated
1918-05-08

Architecture

Status
Church

Functional status
Active

Completed
1918

Construction cost
£3,124

Clergy

Minister(s)
Rev. Wayne Biggs

The Church of the Redeemer is the oldest Moravian Church building in Kingston, Jamaica, and houses a congregation of the Jamaican province of the Moravian Church. It was opened in 1918. The name, which is unusual for a Moravian church, was bestowed by its builder Jonathan Reinke “because he did not want people to speak of Reinke’s church”.[1]

Contents

1 History

1.1 First building
1.2 Present building
1.3 Manse
1.4 Hall
1.5 Organ

2 Clergy
3 Notes and references
4 Bibliography
5 External links

History[edit]
First building[edit]
Kingston’s first Moravian Church (at 23 Hanover Street) was a large house which was adapted for the purpose and consecrated on 1893-04-14.[1] This building and the Mission House next door (at 25 Hanover Street) were destroyed in 1907 by an earthquake.[2] Two shed’s were erected to replace them while a new Church building was constructed.[2]
Present building[edit]
The building at the corner of North Street and Duke Street was consecrated by Bishop Westphal on 1918-05-08.[3] The total cost of the building, site and out buildings was £3,124.[3]
Manse[edit]
A new manse, on the north side of North Street a block to the east, was completed in 1927 at a cost of £921.[3] The manse site was sold to the Gleaner Company for £4,000 in 1949[2] and a new manse purchased in Antrim Road, Vineyard Town.[4]
Hall[edit]

The Mary Morris-Knibb memorial hall, 1963.

A church hall was opened on 1930-12-30 by Lady Stubbs, wife of the Governor. This was destroyed by the hurricane of 1951.[5] A replacement hall was opened in 1962-02-28 at a cost of £16,000.[6]
Organ[edit]
A pipe organ was installed in 1932, reconstructed in 1945 and destroyed during the 1951 hurricane.[5] A replacement was installed in 1953 at a cost of over £3,000.[7]
Clergy[edit]

1893-1894

2009 Superettan

Superettan

Season
2009

Champions
Mjällby AIF

Promoted
Mjällby AIF
Åtvidabergs FF

Relegated
IK Sirius
Vasalunds IF

Matches played
240

Goals scored
701 (2.92 per match)

Top goalscorer
Mattias Adelstam, Ängelholm (19)
Marcus Ekenberg, Mjällby (19)

Average attendance
1,880

← 2008
2010 →

Swedish Football 2009

Allsvenskan (Tier 1)

Superettan (Tier 2)

Division 1 (Tier 3)

Division 2 (Tier 4)

Division 3 (Tier 5)

Svenska Cupen 2009 – Final

The Superettan 2009 was the ninth season of Sweden’s second-tier football league. The season began on 11 April 2009 and ended on 24 October 2009.[1]
The top 2 teams qualified directly for promotion to Allsvenskan, the third played a play-off against the fourteenth from Allsvenskan to decide who qualified to play in Allsvenskan 2010. The bottom 2 teams qualified directly for relegation to Division 1, the thirteenth and the fourteenth played a play-off against the numbers two from Division 1 Södra and Division 1 Norra to decide who qualified to play in Superettan 2010.

Contents

1 Participating teams
2 League table
3 Results
4 Relegation play-offs
5 Season statistics

5.1 Top scorers
5.2 Top assists
5.3 Top goalkeepers

6 Attendances
7 External links
8 References

Participating teams[edit]

AFF

SFC

FFF

JÖN

LBoIS

LSK

MAIF

NOR

QFIF

SIR

GIF

FCT

VIF

VU

ÅFF

ÄFF

Location of the Superettan 2009 teams

Team
Location
Manager
Venue
Capacity
Last season

Assyriska !Assyriska
Södertälje
Robert Johansson
Södertälje Fotbollsarena

6,700

2-04 !4th

Falkenberg !Falkenberg
Falkenberg
Thomas Askebrand
Falkenbergs IP

4,000

2-07 !7th

Jönköpings Södra !Jönköpings Södra
Jönköping
Olle Nordin
Andreas Jankevics
Stadsparksvallen

5,200

2-14 !14th

Landskrona !Landskrona
Landskrona
Anders Linderoth
Landskrona IP

12,000

2-11 !11th

Ljungskile !Ljungskile
Ljungskile
Bo Wålemark
Starke Arvid Arena

6,000

1-14 !14th (Allsvenskan 2008)

Mjällby !Mjällby
Mjällby
Peter Swärdh
Strandvallen

7,500

2-08 !8th

Norrköping !Norrköping
Norrköping
Göran Bergort
Idrottsparken

19,000

1-16 !16th (Allsvenskan 2008)

Qviding !Qviding
Gothenburg
Lars Borgström
Valhalla IP

4,000

2-10 !10th

Sirius !Sirius
Uppsala
Jens T. Andersson
Studenternas IP

7,600

2-12 !12th

Sundsvall !GIF Sundsvall
Sundsvall
Sören Åkeby
Norrporten Arena

7,700

1-15 !15th (Allsvenskan 2008)

Syrianska !Syrianska
Södertälje
Öz

Kara-Suu, Toktogul

Kara-Suu
Кара-Суу

Kara-Suu

Location in Kyrgyzstan

Coordinates: 41°51′30″N 72°55′30″E / 41.85833°N 72.92500°E / 41.85833; 72.92500Coordinates: 41°51′30″N 72°55′30″E / 41.85833°N 72.92500°E / 41.85833; 72.92500

Country
Kyrgyzstan

Region
Jalal-Abad Region

District
Toktogul District

Population (2009)[1]

 • Total
1,609

Time zone
KGT (UTC+6)

Kara-Suu is a village in Toktogul District, Jalal-Abad Region of Kyrgyzstan. Its population was 1,609 in 2009.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b 2009 population census of the Kyrgyz Republic: Jalal-Abad Region at the Wayback Machine (archived 2011-08-10)

v
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e

Populated places in Toktogul District, Jalal-Abad Region

Seat: Toktogul

Cities

Toktogul

Villages

Ak-Jar
Ak-Tektir
Almaluu
Ang-Aryk
Aral
Balykty
Bel-Aldy
Bel-Kara-Suu
Birlik
Buurakan
Chaar-Tash
Chöch-Döbö
Cholpon-Ata
Chong-Aryk
Chorgochu
Eshsay
imeni Kuybysheva
Jangy-Jol
Jetigen
Kamysh-Bashy
Kara-Jygach
Kara-Küngöy
Kara-Suu
Keterme
Kök-Tash
Komsomol
Könür-Ögüz
Korgon
Kötörmö
Kushchu-Suu
Kyzyl-Özgörüsh
Kyzyl-Tuu
Kyzyl-Uraan
Mazar-Suu
Nichke-Say
Noot
Orto-Jon
Sargata
Sary-Sögöt
Shayyk
Terek-Suu
Toluk
Torkent
Üch-Terek

This Jalal-Abad region location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Adrian Johnson (umpire)

80 – Adrian Johnson

Born
(1975-05-25) May 25, 1975 (age 41)
Houston, Texas

MLB debut
April 19, 2006

Umpiring crew

F

Crew members

Gary Cederstrom (crew chief)
Eric Cooper
Jim Wolf
Adrian Johnson

Career highlights and awards

Special Assignments

World Baseball Classic (2006)
All-Star Game (2016)

Adrian Andre Johnson (born May 25, 1975) is an umpire in Major League Baseball. He wears uniform number 80.

Contents

1 Career
2 Notable Games
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Career[edit]
Born in Houston – where he still resides – Johnson worked in the Gulf Coast League, Pioneer League, South Atlantic League, Florida State League, Eastern League and International League before being called up to the MLB in 2006.[1][2] He also officiated in the 2006 World Baseball Classic. Johnson was named to the full-time Major League staff prior to the 2010 season.
Notable Games[edit]
Johnson was the home plate umpire for Edwin Jackson’s no-hitter on June 25, 2010.[1]
He was the home plate umpire when the New York Yankees hit a record three grand slams against the Oakland Athletics on August 25, 2011.
He was at third base on June 1, 2012 when Johan Santana no-hit the St. Louis Cardinals,[3] making a controversial “foul ball” ruling over a hard ground ball hit by Carlos Beltrán in the sixth inning [4]
On July 2, 2013, Johnson was the home plate umpire when Homer Bailey of the Cincinnati Reds pitched a no-hitter against the San Francisco Giants at Great American Ballpark.[5]
Johnson served as the left field umpire in the 2016 MLB All-Star Game in San Diego.
See also[edit]

Baseball portal

List of Major League Baseball umpires

References[edit]

^ a b “Adrian Johnson – 80”. MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved 2011-08-31. 
^ “Adrian Johnson”. Retrosheet.org. Retrosheet. Retrieved 2011-08-31. 
^ Boxscore: St. Louis vs. NY Mets – June 1, 2012 MLB.com. Retrieved 1 June 2012
^ Langosch, Jenifer. Disputed call aids Santana’s historic feat MLB.com. Retrieved 2 June 2012
^ “Reds’ Homer Bailey throws his 2nd no-hitter in last 10 months”. ESPN.com. Associated Press. Retrieved July 5, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Major League profile
Retrosheet

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Current Major League Baseball umpires

Jordan Baker (71)
Lance Barksdale (23)
Lance Barrett (94)
Ted Barrett (65)
Scott Barry (87)
Dan Bellino (2)
Cory Blaser (89)
C. B.&

Indian economic census

Indian economic census is the census of the Indian economy through counting all entrepreneurial units in the country which involved in any economic activities of either agricultural or non-agricultural sector which engaged in production and/or distribution of goods and/or services not for the sole purpose of own consumption.[1]
The economic census provides detailed information on operational and other characteristics such as number of establishments, number of persons employed, source of finance, type of ownership etc. These information used for micro level/ decentralized planning and to assess contribution of various sectors of the economy in the gross domestic product (GDP).[2]
Economic census[edit]
In 1976, Government of India launched a plan scheme called Economic Census and Surveys. In 1977 Central Statistical Organisation conducted First economic census in collaboration with the Directorate of Economics & Statistics (DES) in the States/Union Territories.

Economic Census
Year

First Economic Census
1977

Second Economic Census
1980

Third Economic Census
1990

Fourth Economic Census
1998

Fifth Economic Census
2005

Sixth Economic Census
2013

References[edit]

^ “Directorate of Economics & Statistics”. Statistics.rajasthan.gov.in. 2005-06-15. Retrieved 2013-06-22. 
^ “Press Information Bureau English Releases”. Pib.nic.in. Retrieved 2013-06-22. 

v
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Census of India

Pre-Independence

National Censuses

Overview
1871
1891

Regional Censuses

Delhi: 1901

Post-Independence

National Censuses

1951
1961
1991
2001
2011

Other Censuses

Indian economic census
2011 Socio Economic and Caste Census

See Also: Registrar General and Census Commissioner of India

This article related or pertaining to the economy of India is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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수원오피

Dialog Control Language

Dialog Control Language (DCL) is a high-level description language and interpreter within AutoCAD for creating simple graphical dialogs. AutoLISP extensions use it to interact with the user in the AutoCAD environment.

Contents

1 Features and usage
2 Example
3 Alternative technologies
4 External links

Features and usage[edit]
Unlike other major GUI APIs, DCL is not a complete GUI toolkit for application programming. It is only intended for providing simple dialogs within AutoCAD. It includes basic form widgets such as text boxes, buttons, checkboxes and list boxes. DCL is object-oriented; it allows re-use through inheritance and composition.
DCL syntax is based on defining and using ’tiles’. A ’tile’ represents a GUI widget such as a text box or a text label. Tiles also represent widgets that hold other widgets, such as columns, radio button groups and the dialogs themselves. DCL provides built-in tiles for all major widgets, and new tiles can be defined through inheritance and composition of other tiles.
DCL allows interactions with the dialog at run-time by Lisp code. Certain widgets can have actions associated with them by naming an AutoLISP function to be run, and values to be passed to it. Unlike other types of GUIs, DCL dialogs cannot be changed substantially at run time. The contents of certain widgets such as text boxes and list boxes can be changed, but widgets cannot be removed from or added to the dialog.
Example[edit]
Here is an example DCL file (and accompanying AutoLISP file) demonstrating the major features of DCL.

name_button : button {
label = “Submit name”;
action = “(change-name)”;
}

hello : dialog {
label = “DCL Example”;

: edit_box {
label = “Name: “;
key = “name”;
}

: name_button {
key = “submit-name”;
}

: text {
key = “greeting”;
}

ok_only;
}

The dialog is created by inheriting from the built-in tile ‘dialog’. Properties are set on the dialog and other widgets in name/value pairs. Tiles can be placed inside the dialog just by naming them, or by naming them and specifying additional properties. A new tile (‘name_button’) is defined for use by naming it and specifying properties for it.

; DCL is saved as “hello.dcl”
(defun change-name ()
(set_tile “greeting” (strcat “Hello, ” (get_tile “name”) “!”)))

(setq hello-dcl (load_dialog “hello.dcl”))
(new_dialog “hello” hello-dcl)
(start_dialog)
(unload_dialog hello-dcl)

A DCL dialog is instantiated by calling a series of functions in an AutoLisp file. Tile
소라넷

FK Brodoremont Kladovo

Brodoremont

Full name
Fudbalski klub Brodoremont

Founded
1973

League
Zona Istok

2015–16
Zona Istok, 11. Season 2014/15., www.srbijasport.net,

Home colours

Away colours

FK Brodoremont is a football club based in Kladovo, Serbia. The club was founded in 1973.
Club colour is blue.

External links[edit]

[1]

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Football in Serbia

Football Association of Serbia
List of venues

Overview

Clubs
Venues
Champions
Players
Coaches
Referees
Awards
Foreigners

National teams

Men

Serbia

U21
U20
U19
U17

Yugoslavia

Women

Serbia

U19
U17

League competitions

Men

SuperLiga
First League
Serbian League

Belgrade
East
Vojvodina
West

Zone League

Belgrade
Banat
Bačka
Novi Sad-Syrmia
Drina
Dunav
Morava
East
South
West
North Kosovo

Okružna Liga
Međuopštinska Liga
Opštinska Liga
Druga Opštinska Liga

Women

Super Liga
First Women’s League
Second Women’s League

North
South

Cup competitions

Men

Cup

Women

Cup

조개넷

Michael Paul Mason

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (November 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Michael Paul Mason

Born
(1971-05-29) May 29, 1971 (age 45)
Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S.

Occupation
Writer

Nationality
American

Genre
Science, non-fiction

Notable works
Head Cases: Stories of Brain Injury and Its Aftermath

Website

www.michaelpaulmason.com

Michael Paul Mason (born May 29, 1971, in Tulsa, Oklahoma), sometimes credited as Michael Mason, is an American writer, author, editor, and journalist.

Contents

1 Literary work
2 Bibliography

2.1 Books
2.2 Articles

3 Radio Production
4 External links
5 References

Literary work[edit]
Mason’s first book of non-fiction, Head Cases: Stories of Brain Injury and Its Aftermath, chronicles the years he spent as a brain-injury case manager and tells the stories of twelve individuals who survived brain injury.[1]
While a contributing editor for Discover magazine, Mason wrote the article, “Dead Men Walking”, which triggered a national debate about the treatment of brain-injured veterans of the Iraq War.[2] As an independent radio producer, Mason has created works that have appeared on several public radio stations.
Mason is the founding editor of This Land Press, a publication based in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
Bibliography[edit]
Books[edit]

Head Cases: Stories of Brain Injury and Its Aftermath (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008)

Articles[edit]

“Dead Men Walking”, Discover (2007)
“Iraq’s Medical Meltdown”, Discover (2007)
“The 9/11 Cover-Up”, Discover (2007)
“How to Teach Science to the Pope”, Discover (2008)
“Keeping Our Heads” (op-ed), The New York Times (2009)
“Narrative Lost and Found”, This Land Press (2010)
“The Future of Writing is in My Jacket”, The Late American Novel: Writers on the Future of Books, Soft Skull Press (2011)
“Subterranean Psychonaut: The Strange and Dreadful Saga of Gordon Todd Skinner” (with Chris Sandel and Lee Roy Chapman), This Land Press (2013)

Radio Production[edit]

“Inside the Glore,” (2009)
“The Guardian of the Murder House,” (2009)
“Goodbye Tulsa” (weekly series)

External links[edit]

Official website
This Land Press
Head Cases

References[edit]

^ Seattle Times review
^ Discover magazine article

Authority control

오피와우

Thomas Fortune Ryan

Thomas F. Ryan

Thomas Fortune Ryan in the 1910s

Born
(1851-10-17)October 17, 1851
Nelson County, Virginia, U.S.

Died
November 23, 1928(1928-11-23) (aged 77)
New York City, New York, U.S.

Occupation
Financier

Net worth
US$155 million at the time of his death (approximately 1/633rd of US GNP)[1]

Political party
Democrat

Spouse(s)
1) Ida Mary Barry (1854–1917)
2) Mary Townsend Nicoll Lord Cuyler

Children
1) John Barry (1874–1942)
2) Thomas Fortune, Jr. (1876–1882)
3) William Keane (1878–1906) [1]
4) Allan Aloysius (1880–1940)
5) Clendenin James (1882–1939)
6) Mary Loretta (1884–1888)
7) Joseph James (1890–1920) [2]

Thomas Fortune Ryan (1851–1928) was an American tobacco, insurance and transportation magnate. Although he lived in New York City for much of his adult career, Ryan was perhaps the greatest benefactor of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Richmond in the decades before the Great Depression. In addition to paying for schools, hospitals and other charitable works, Ryan’s donations paid for the construction of the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Richmond, Virginia. Ryan also made significant donations to Catholic institutions in New York City and Washington, D.C.

Contents

1 Early days
2 Conversion
3 Fortune building
4 Philanthropy
5 Later years
6 Death and legacy
7 References
8 External links

Early days[edit]
Thomas Fortune Ryan was born on October 17, 1851, near Lovingston, Virginia, the county seat of Nelson County. Despite a myth promulgated by Cleveland Amory regarding his background, Ryan was neither orphaned nor penniless as a youth, nor did his ancestors flee the Potato Famine as did many who worked on or rode his streetcars. Rural Virginia where Ryan grew up attracted few of those emigrants. Ryan’s father was a tailor and managed a small hotel. He traced his ancestry to Protestant Anglo-Irish settlers who came to North America in the seventeenth century.[2]
Ryan’s mother, Lucinda Fortune Ryan, died in 1856 when he was five years old. His father remarried and moved to Tennessee two years later. Ryan was raised as a Protestant by his mother’s extended family in Lovingston, south of Charlottesville in Virginia’s Piedmont. Local Baptist ministers taught the youth to read and write, but Ryan did not attend college. Before the American Civil War, Ryan and his younger brother owned three slaves.
Conversion[edit]
Aged 17, three years after the war ended, Ryan fled the lack of economic opportunity f
중국야동

Hepatitis F virus

This article is about the hypothetical virus. For the virus family Togavirus, see Togaviridae.
Main article: Hepatitis
Hepatitis F is a hypothetical virus linked to hepatitis. Several hepatitis F candidates emerged in the 1990s; however none of these claims were substantiated.[1][2][3]
In 1994, Deka et al. reported that novel viral particles had been discovered in the stool of post-transfusion, non-hepatitis A, non-hepatitis B, non-hepatitis C, non-hepatitis E patients.[4] Injection of these particles into the bloodstream of Indian rhesus monkeys caused hepatitis, and the virus was named hepatitis F or Toga virus. Further investigations failed to confirm the existence of the virus, and it was delisted as a cause for infectious hepatitis.[3][5]
A subsequently-discovered virus thought to cause hepatitis was named Hepatitis G virus, though its role in hepatitis has not been confirmed and it is now considered synonymous with GB virus C and is an “orphan virus” with no causal links to any human disease.[6]
References[edit]

^ Uchida, T. (1993). “Genetic Variations of the Hepatitis B Virus and Their Clinical Relevance”. Microbiol. Immunol. 37 (6): 425–39. doi:10.1111/j.1348-0421.1993.tb03233.x. PMID 7694049. 
^ Fagan, E. A. (1994). “Acute Liver Failure of Unknown Pathogenesis: The Hidden Agenda”. Hepatology. 19 (5): 1307–12. doi:10.1002/hep.1840190532. PMID 8175156. 
^ a b Bowden, S. (2001). “New Hepatitis Viruses: Contenders and Pretenders”. J Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 16 (2): 124–31. doi:10.1046/j.1440-1746.2001.02405.x. PMID 11207890. 
^ Deka N, Sharma MD, Mukerjee R (1994). “Isolation of the novel agent from human stool samples that is associated with sporadic non-A, non-B hepatitis”. J. Virol. 68 (12): 7810–5. PMC 237242. PMID 7966570. 
^ Kelly, D.; Skidmore, S. (2002). “Hepatitis C-Z: recent advances”. Arch. Dis. Child. 86 (5): 339–43. doi:10.1136/adc.86.5.339. PMC 1751087. PMID 11970925. 
^ Lefrère J. J.; Laperche, S.; Roudot-Thoraval, F. (April 2008). “Hepatitis G Virus: A Suitable Marker of in vivo Efficacy for Pathogen Inactivation”. Vox Sang. 95 (1): 76–8. doi:10.1111/j.1423-0410.2008.01050.x. PMID 18393946. 

부천오피